Random act or publicity stunt?

By Heath Brandon via Creative Commons

When you witness something are you really seeing what’s going on?

The other day I was walking  a brick path lined with wooden benches. Perennial gardens and low shade trees flank the walkway, which connects a library, courthouse, municipal offices and a veteran’s memorial. Rising above all this is a bronze sculpture encircled by a splashy water fountain. It’s a peaceful, pretty area generally populated by teen boys rumbling around on  skateboards, seniors parked on benches, and children chasing pigeons. It also has a lot of homeless people.

On this day, the walkways were empty. As I followed the path, supervising Girl from the East’s balancing act on the garden wall, I noticed an attractive, well-dressed man walking toward us at a brisk clip. His mouth threatened a smile. His eyes and whatever story they might tell  were hidden behind dark glasses. He balanced a cardboard pizza box on one upturned palm. Mr. Well-Dressed passed us, turned and leaned over a white-bearded homeless man slouched on a bench. The pizza box exchanged hands. Mr. Well-Dressed  – was he a lawyer from the courthouse or one of the local business owners on a break — crouched to get at eye level with Mr. Homeless and began talking to him in a low voice.

At this point my attention shifted to Girl from the East, who was attempting a jump off  the wall. But I couldn’t get Mr. Well-Dressed out of my mind. It wasn’t his looks or his clothing. It was what he did. It really moved me.

When I worked in this town years ago, my co-workers and I occasionally (and by that I mean rarely) would leave food offerings on benches and in doorways. Generally it was a bag of bagels or takeout leftovers. I’ve never had the courage to hand food directly to someone on the street.

I looked back at the two engaged in quiet conversation. I tried to read body language. I tried to eavesdrop. Was this a random act? Did this guy pick a different person each week or each day to feed? Did the two strike some kind of deal earlier? Was this an attorney-client thing? Why the heck was I obsessing as usual about something that did not concern me.

As I walked toward my car, a breathless woman clutching a cell phone caught up to me.

“Did you see? It’s him, isn’t it?” she asked.

“Who?”

“That GUY! The one who just gave a pizza to the homeless man. He was on ‘The Sopranos.’ I can’t think of his name,” she said, clearly hoping I’d jump on her bandwagon.

“I never watched that show,” I said, shrugging and beginning to feel like I was on one of those candid camera shows.

I looked around for Mr. Well-Dressed. His good deed completed, he was now heading toward  the parking lot. Pinstriped lawyer? Incognito actor on a personal mission?  Weird set-up for ‘Punk’d'?

Ms. Enthusiastic was still going on about ‘The Sopranos.’  She said something about a cop show in Detroit. I shook my head, told her I really had no idea who he was.  Then she was off to follow Mr. Well-Dressed to his car.

I went home. I Googled. I looked at pictures online. I think Mr. Well-Dressed really was Mr. Actor Guy.

Maybe.

I’d like to think I witnessed something random and kind. I’d like not to think of this as some celebrity sighting, something that made its way around Twitter or Facebook. I don’t like the creeping cynicism that poisons my thoughts.

When you see something happen, do you really know what you’re seeing?

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9 thoughts on “Random act or publicity stunt?

  1. That would be Michael Imperioli. I have heard several stories about him doing things of that nature. Never in the press, usually from people who see him during filming of Detroit 187. He seems like a really good guy.

  2. Hmmm . . . I hope that’s true, that it’s not scripted or a stunt. Although I think stunts are generally more thought out by PR people and there’d be some sort of tip off so that the media attention would be there.

    It’s what I hope, anyway.

  3. Suniverse: I’m with you. Why would someone do that if no one was around? It was suggested to me afterward that it might be a PR stunt. It didn’t feel that way.
    Mike: Ooh, I hadn’t thought of the haunting angle in all this.

  4. Meleah Rebecca: A homeless man had a nice, hot pizza. That’s a good thing. Now, if only the celebrities could help solve our economic crisis.

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